Sunday, March 24, 2019

Setting a Table in the 1920’s


In “Nancy Page” – The Pages are Entertained at an Architect’s Dinner

When Nancy and Peter returned from their southern trip they were welcomed back by the Culvers. They gave a dinner party for eight couples. Knowing that Nancy and Peter were interested in building, the centerpiece appropriately enough was a toy house. It set bravely in the midst of shrubbery made from small bitse of sponges dyed green. The place cards were small blue prints and each service plate was set on a simulated plate doily of a blue print. One doily showed the upstairs, another gave a side view, or a front elevation and so forth. The soup was served with toast sticks arranged log cabin fashion. Mrs. Culver said that the dessert should have been that popular, but dreadful, dish called “tin roof,” but she could not bring herself to spoil her dinner in that way. Of course they had chocolate chips as candy. 
She allowed eighteen inches space for each guest. This space is called a “cover.” On each cover she placed a service plate in the center and one inch from edge of table.

Mrs. Culver knew the way in which a table should be set. She allowed eighteen inches space for each guest. This space is called a “cover.” On each cover she placed a service plate in the center and one inch from edge of table. On the plate was a large dinner napkin folded in thirds and then in fifths. At the head of the forks was the bread and butter plate with bread and butter knife placed squarely across the plate. The salad fork was close to the plate on the left and the dinner fork was on outside left. The knife was at right of plate with soup spoon beyond that. Goblet was at top of knife. All sliver was exactly one inch from edge of table. This formality of setting makes for good looking tables, as Mrs. Culver knew. If you are interested in further details of table etiquette, write to Nancy Page, care of this paper, enclosing a stamped, self-addressed envelope, asking for her leaflet on “Table Etiquette.”– By Florence LaGanke syndicated as “Nancy Page”, San Pedro News Pilot, 1929

Etiquette Enthusiast, Maura J Graber, is the Site Editor for the Etiquipedia© Etiquette Encyclopedia

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