Monday, February 15, 2021

Etiquette Accuracy in Films

 

‘Prince Bernadotte has an easier problem in supervising court etiquette. His main job is to be on hand when Colman as King Rudolph and Madeleine Carrol as Princess Flavia go through their paces. He's always handy for advice on what to do and how to do it. That is, on almost all court subjects except love scenes. When the King and Princess are alone in the garden, the Prince can play checkers or take a nap, realizing that the etiquette of romance is none of his business.” —Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. (left), and Ronald Colman in The Prisoner of Zenda



Hollywood Film Shop

HOLLYWOOD (U.P.) Search for authenticity in pictures, particularly those which deal with historical subjects, is always an expensive and painstaking job. It would seem to be news when Selznick International spends the money and hires the brains to make sure “The Prisoner of Zenda” is NOT authentic. 

To avoid international complications, the studio has hired two experts to figure out ways of doing it the wrong thing in a legitimate manner. Col. Ivar Enhoring, retired Swedish army officer, will be commissioned to design uniforms for the many military scenes. Prince Sigvard Bernadotte, son of Sweden's Crown Prince, who renounced his rights of accession to wed a commoner, will decree the correct Royal Court and military etiquette.
 
After studying specifications and pictures of some 600 uniforms, Enhoring expects to turn out authentic appearing costumes for the soldiers which could not be identified as belonging to any particular country. The uniforms have to be military, yet with epaulets, buttons and decorations all so individual, that no foreign power can take offense. 

Ronald Colman as the King of a European country, required a coat of arms. Trying to find one that didn’t infringe on the thousands in existence was a real headache, a complete library of heraldry was assembled to determine what designs to let alone. Even the fencing scenes have a style all their own. Ralph Faulkner, an Olympic fencing champion, was hired to devise a new style that combines the elements of German, Italian, French and English fencing. 

Prince Bernadotte has an easier problem in supervising Court etiquette. His main job is to be on hand when Colman as King Rudolph and Madeleine Carrol as Princess Flavia go through their paces. He's always handy for advice on what to do and how to do it. That is, on almost all court subjects except love scenes. When the King and Princess are alone in the garden, the Prince can play checkers or take a nap, realizing that the etiquette of romance is none of his business.— United Press, 1937



Etiquette Enthusiast, Maura J. Graber, is the Site Editor for the Etiquipedia© Etiquette Encyclopedia

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