Saturday, March 18, 2017

A Pie Etiquette Plea

"All we insist upon in the name of true etiquette, is that the knife should do its share of the labor, and that the fork should not be compelled unassisted to bear the heat and burden of dissection." — Did some folks not get the memo about the dual utensil? In the mid-19th century, silver companies decided on a combination of forks and knives, to create "Pie Forks" 

A Plea for the Knife

We are not too​ enamored of the knife, and to favor its use in preference to the fork as a means of conveying one'e food to one's month. On the contrary, we are as much opposed to this use of the knife as any one possibly could be. But we hold, nevertheless, that the knife should not be utterly ignored at the table. Where, for instance, the pie crust set before you is excessively inflexible, there is a sort of constructive insult to your hostess in your vain attempts to cut throngh it with a fork. Its toughness is made obvious by your exertions, and in endeavoring to cut the pie crust you enly succeed in cutting into the sensibilities of your hostess. 

By using your knife, on the contrary, your pie crust is divided into eatable portions with neatness and dispatch, and its firmness of texture is remarked by no one. We are sure that no genuine pie lover will deny that in cutting one's pie with one's knife and carrying it piece by piece to the mouth by aid of the fork, ample recognition is accorded to the demands of etiquette; for to thoroughly enjoy one's pie, neither knife nor fork is necessary. As a matter of fact, either is an impertinence. 

The true and only satisfying way to eat pie is to take it up in one's hand, and by gently but firmly pressing the pointed end of the wedge in one's mouth to slough off its beneficence with grateful teeth until its richness is all your own. This is the way to enjoy pie. But we are not talking of enjoyment. Our business is with etiquette. Therefore, we will relegate the true form of pie eating to the privacy of the cupboard, where the hasty snack is taken. All we insist upon in the name of true etiquette, is that the knife should do its share of the labor, and that the fork should not be compelled unassisted to bear the heat and burden of dissection.—Boston Transcript, 1891

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