Saturday, January 2, 2016

Telephone Etiquette and Success

A Pleasing and Distinct Voice 
is a Real Asset!
Telephone etiquette, declares the Christian Science Monitor, is not limited to any arbitrary rules laid down for the instruction of its subscribers. 

Telephone Etiquette Combination of Common Sense and Consideration

What may be called telephone etiquette, declares a writer in the Christian Science Monitor, is not limited to any arbitrary rules laid down by this or that telephone company for the instruction of its subscribers. But it is so far-reaching as to include all the general amenities of daily life now associated with the use of the telephone that make things easier and pleasanter for all concerned and, incidentally insure the best results. 

A "party line" was a telephone line or circuit shared by two or more subscribers.
Like most rules of etiquette, the writer finds that the underlying rule of telephone etiquette is a combination of common sense and consideration for others. Co-operation is the word used in telephone circles, but it is a product of co-operation not only on the part of the one who calls, but also of the operator and of the person who answers the call.

Good manners on the telephone, in its use both in business and social relations, is dependent upon clear enunciation. Not only is it courteous to make oneself understood by the person answering the call, but it is necessary that the operator should understand quickly and clearly, not only the number given, but the name of the exchange.

Another effect of improved enunciation is that it becomes a valuable social and business accomplishment, for unconsciously, the intelligent use of the telephone leads to a more careful choice of words and a more pleasing tone of voice. An upward inflection of the voice gives a cheerier air to the conversation. 
Good telephone manners also include thoughtfulness as to the time.
Brevity and conciseness over the telephone should not be mistaken for curtness or brusqueness, which are always quickly noticeable at the other end of the wire, and should be carefully avoided. Another element of telephone etiquette is the prompt answer to a call and in making yourself known at once, while the party who makes the call Is usually the one who should end the conversation. 

Good telephone manners also include thoughtfulness as to the time the calling person is on the wire and reasonable brevity in the conversation, especially when one is using a party line. —The Madera Tribune, 1927

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