Friday, December 11, 2015

Etiquette and Outdoor Entertainments

The refreshments for a picnic consist chiefly of cold dishes such as meats, boned turkey, game, patés, sandwiches, salads, cakes, jellies, pies, punch, lemonade, claret and champagne.


Modes and Manners for Sports, Hunt Breakfasts and Picnics
Now that the fashionable world is, so to speak, out of town, hunting, tennis and other outdoor sports are in order. According to manners, the etiquette, when taking part in hunting, shooting, fishing, etc..., is quickly learned by those interested in them. 
For instance, any man chosen to to master of the hounds would be one who had such experience in the hunting field that the duties attending his new position would be easily understood by him. It is customary in sections of the country where hounds meet for any of the residents interested in the sport to give a “hunt” or “meet” breakfast during the season to the master of the hounds and to all comers.  
This breakfast ought to be an informal affair, the food being much the same as would be offered at any ordinary morning entertainment. Tennis clubs and athletic associations, each and all, usually have clearly defined rules, which ought to be carefully read and followed by everybody desirous of connection with them. 
When one person gives a picnic, that one person, of course, provides everything, the mode of conveyance, the refreshments, entertainment, etc... Where several persons, however, join in issuing the invitations to a picnic, the labor and expense should be equally divided.  
The refreshments for a picnic consist chiefly of cold dishes such as meats, boned turkey, game, patés, sandwiches, salads, cakes, jellies, pies, punch, lemonade, claret and champagne. A picnic generally lasts from noon until twilight, and the best season of the year is when it is most pleasant to be out of doors.  
Dancing is the chief amusement after eating, and a wooden platform is erected for the purpose nowadays. Dancing on the green sounds poetical, but modern picnickers do not take to it kindly. —Red Bluff Daily News, 1892

Etiquette Enthusiast, Maura J. Graber, is the Site Moderator and Editor for Etiquipedia© Etiquette Encyclopedia